Router with VoIP gateway

Router with VoIP gateway

In addition to single-box routers and VoIP gateways, there are also available devices that contain devices in a single box:
A router on the basis of which a computer network can be built,
VoIP gateway, which allows you to make phone calls.
These routers allow you to create a local area network (LAN) to which you can connect other devices, such as computers and network printers, but also VoIP gateways or VoIP phones. Depending on the model and hardware manufacturer, these may be simple devices that allow you to connect more devices, but they may also be whole network “combines” that allow you to create and configure advanced networks and network services, for example, building tunnels, security and access policies and other network services.
Figure: Router with one-port switch and two-port VoIP gateway
Legend: WAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection from the Internet LAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection of: computer, local IP network, network devices FXS socket (type RJ-11) – connection of telephone sets Ethernet cable terminated with RJ-45 plugs Flat telephone cable, two or four wires terminated with RJ-11 plugs
Another subgroup in this category are routers with VoIP gateway that can simultaneously create a cable and wireless network. Thanks to this, in addition to the possibility of traditional connection of peripheral devices (cable), we also have the ability to connect other devices by radio transmission.
Another variation of this type of devices are routers with VoIP gateways and ADSL modem[1], which means that these devices can replace traditional modems for Internet access links implemented on traditional telephone lines.
From the point of view of this article, the most important is the fact that one device contains a VoIP gateway and a router that can be used to create a computer network. It is important because the models from the so called higher shelf in this hardware category contain built-in QoS[2] mechanisms, which means that they can control the packet traffic either by giving them priority or by separating the band for transmission of “voice packets” or when connecting other VoIP devices to such a router, giving priority in packet traffic for a given LAN port. What does it matter? Very important for us, because thanks to this functionality, packets containing voice are sent faster than packets containing data – they are “more authorized”. In other words, we have at least a partial influence on the quality of our Internet connection.
In a large part of simpler devices such as a router with a VoIP gateway, the constructors have provided two FXS-type sockets enabling connection of telephones or line cards of city telephone exchanges to them. In these constructions, one telephone port is a possibility to program one user account, so two sockets are two user accounts from one or two VoIP service providers.
However, in many more advanced constructions, these devices also have two telephone ports built in, but the device itself can be programmed with not more than two user accounts as in simpler models, but more, e.g. four, eight or twelve. Thanks to this, in our peripheral devices connected to VoIP sockets, we have a choice, through which user account we want to make a call. In such a situation, when making outgoing calls, we must use appropriate additional tags, so that our device “knows” that for the phone number just selected from the keyboard, the call is to be made through this, and not another user account. Depending on the device and manufacturer, such a tag can be dialed before a number or after a number. Such a tag is e.g. “#7”. (cross seven) which informs the VoIP gateway that we want to call through the seventh user account. In the case of incoming calls we can also indicate to which physical port these calls are to be directed (which of the connected phones is to call).
Often we can use the second method, which greatly facilitates dialing numbers and permanently enter the call pattern to the device, such as international calls: to the United States are to be automatically implemented by the first user account, calls to France by the second user account. Calls to the US: in the own numbering zone by the third, calls to other numbering zones by the fourth, and to mobile phones by the fifth user account. In such a model, the system – based on a selected combination of digits – directs calls itself through the relevant user accounts. There is some automation here and we do not need to remember which VoIP operator to call in order to make our calls as cheap as possible.
Despite such an extension with a larger number of user accounts

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